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Piracy: It’s complicated, like love!

Can art which is so fluid in nature actually belong to someone? ParomitaVohra tries to answer this in her ‘Partners in crime’. Can art which is so fluid in nature actually belong to someone? ParomitaVohra tries to answer this in her ‘Partners in crime’.


The film points light to a fact that is mostly not noticed by many that is how the contradiction of capitalism shows itself in the sphere of art. That music belongs to everyone since it is a product of society and cannot simply be owned by a monopoly.

Through visits to various towns and villages Paromita’s film shows us how communities create art forms which are later in some way borrowed or altered to be made into a Bollywood jingle. This jingle now holds copyrights and hence cannot be claimed by such communities as their ‘art forms’.

This critique she brings out by portraying art as Sita and Ravanna as a monopoly that purchases this art. Ravanna later takes Sita away to a far away land away from everyone.

The documentary points out at how costly it is to purchase rights of music for the masses yet how the ‘masses’ cannot afford this and hence decides to support piracy, through this the film criticizes the definition of ‘market’ according to capitalism and how the definition has more to do with profit and control, rather than with what the people want.

Love for music and art continues with piracy. It is to the credit of the film maker who conveys technical and complex subjects like the grey world of Intellectual Property Rights, piracy; easy access of the Torrent downloads through the everlasting them of “Love”.

According to the director, when we love, we share. Through this incessant sharing the “love” enters the world of piracy and the complicated territories of the corporate world. Like our favorite love stories issues get further complicated--pirates vigorously “protect” their love and the digital copyrights laws and the Open Source era never seem to reach a common understanding.


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